Food Photography – some Tips and Tricks

Food Porn is definitely a ‘Thing’!

Instagram is thriving because we love looking at beautiful food pictures. It does not only create cravings but also presents a lifestyle – healthy food, convenient food, comfort food, etc. Great food photography makes people want to be part of the bigger picture. I mean is it really about the Chewy Sultana Cookies that Deliciously Ella makes? I doubt it. It is about her, her story and philosophy, her lifestyle that inspires people to live healthier lives. But to buy into a story like this, we want to see lovely pictures that help us visualise what we could have – and she does that pretty well.

My food photography is not the greatest (yet!) but I am working on it. 🙂 A year ago I treated myself to a really nice DSLR Sony camera, which I use a lot for my pictures. However, you don’t need heavy equipment anymore or spend a fortune on an excellent camera. Thanks to all those new Photo Editor Apps, ‘photoshopping’ has become pretty easy and made food photography a lot more accessible. But there is more to a good picture than changing the filter and adding some fake highlights.

I recently attended a workshop by Echo Food Sessions in collaboration with Grub Club , who invited professional photographer and Instagram enthusiast Isabelle to lead a workshop on how to do great food photography for your business using the simplest of tools – your phone and Instagram. The Grub Club has summarised some of her top tips:

Get Inspired

  • Browse through food magazines, blogs and Instagram feeds, and replicate things you like.
  • As well as your food, think about other ways you can tell the story of your business/brand – how about some pictures of your suppliers, your prep process, or people enjoying your food at an event?

Setting Up Your Shot

  • Try out different layers and textures in the background – everything from wooden chopping boards to slate, to fabric like tablecloths and napkins (make sure you iron them first).
  • Take pictures from directly above – stand on a chair, or even arrange your shoot on the floor so you can get a good angle.
  • Have plenty of natural light streaming through – daylight is the best setting for food photography.
  • Use props to offset the balance of your shot – e.g. a knife halfway on the plate, a sprig of mint in the background, a little glass with flowers in a corner.
  • Keep it simple – don’t overload the plate or surroundings: focus on the food and use a few striking props to enhance.

Using Instagram

  • Take pictures using your camera app, and upload them into Instagram afterwards – that way you can select the best ones, crop and edit to get the very best picture.
  • Don’t just use filters – use the wrench tool to adjust things like brightness and structure. Try Tilt Shift to focus different areas of the picture.
  • When choosing a filter, you can adjust the level of filter to apply by double clicking on the filter and sliding to adjust.
  • Add a location so your picture will appear on maps.
  • Use hashtags to describe your picture and engage others – Tagmoatic is a useful tool for generating hashtags.
  • Try the new layout tool for creating collages.

10676152_737341076359664_7818741127446994585_n

Adding to the above, my advice is

  • Use small portions – you don’t need to take a picture of an entire serving size. A small portion of all the goodness you created is absolutely sufficient for a great picture.
  • Add ingredients into your picture -it is really nice for the other person looking at your picture to follow the story of your dish. What ingredients have you used, how have you prepared it?
  • Use colours in your food – make your dish stand out more by adding accents. Perhaps some pomegranate on white yoghurt and a mint leaf. Complimentary colours can create some striking optical effects.
  • Take your time & prepare in advance – block out an entire morning/afternoon (best when it is light) and get everything you need in advance. It takes a while until you get the perfect shot. I requires a lot of experimenting and trying out. You don’t want to realise afterwards that all your pictures are rubbish. Prepare and get all the props and ingredients in advance so you can focus on photographing, not wasting time on getting your bits and bobs together. Plus not being stressed by time pressure makes it an easier and more enjoyable process.

To see a few of my food photograpy, follow me on Instagram at FoodInbrixton and Bruench_popup

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Brewedboy's Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

brixtoncornercopia.wordpress.com/

65 Brixton Village Market, SW9 8PS brixtoncornercopia@googlemail.com 07919542233

pexmas.wordpress.com/

Festivals, Events, Markets, Community.

love2feed

His & her incredible eating adventures

ideas.ted.com

Explore ideas worth spreading

Anderson & Co

139 Bellenden Road, London, SE15 4DH 0207 469 7078 lisa@andersonandcompany.co.uk for dinner bookings

%d bloggers like this: